The Pastor’s Desk

July 13th, 2018

We live in a world filled with conflict, and if you are like me, I don't enjoy conflict.  As Christians we pray for peace.  We want to get along with everyone.  We realize that others have different views and opinions than we do, but we do not hate them for it.  Conversely, people seem to despise us for the beliefs we hold dear. Do you wonder why the values we embrace make us "politically incorrect?"

As Christians, we do not want to cause problems.  We certainly do not want to offend anyone, but we believe that there is a difference between right and wrong.  Every day we are faced with a choice: do we stand quietly by and say nothing?  Or do we cling to our principles and stand up, and speak out?

When we read the scriptures, it becomes clear which approach we should take.  We find numerous examples to light our path.  We see many examples of men and women embracing the truth, standing by their beliefs, and holding fast to their principles and values.  We find Christians who know what they believe.  We see men and women of conviction and faith.  We read the accounts of those brave souls who possessed the courage to make tough decisions; to swim against the current.

The core values they internalized and the strength of their convictions allowed many of these heroes and heroines to face persecution, and even death, with unwavering resolve.  There are the examples of Joshua and Caleb, Esther, Daniel, David, Shadrach, Mesach and Abednego, and many others.  When we study the scriptures, it becomes clear which choice we must make. It is the choice to stand up, to speak out, to go against the grain and let our voice be heard.  We must not hide. We must not compromise with what we believe to be right, no matter what consequences follow.  For if we deny Christ, He will deny us.

True Christians must "take the path less traveled."  If we find ourselves on the "outside," if we find ourselves to be "politically incorrect," then we are in good company, for this is where Christ found himself.  He never sinned. He loved His enemies and prayed for them.  He brought a message of peace and hope to the world.  But in the end, He was crucified for what He believed and taught.

History is replete with the examples of the prophets, apostles, and other disciples of Christ who suffered persecution, torture, and who were put to death for standing up and speaking out for the things they believed.  Christians will follow the example Christ set, and, if they are truly "Christians," their voices will be heard.  Their voices must be heard!  The world will be a better place because of it.

If we believe that the Word of God is our guide, that it is the final authority defining what is right and what is wrong, and that we must live our lives according to it, we will not be popular.  We will come under attack by those who would like to reshape what we are and what we believe.  The "politically correct" will attempt to change us into their image, and will be relentless in their pursuit of this goal.  They will label what we say as hateful and dangerous.  When they do, we must not cave.

We must steadfastly resist the urge to conform and go with the flow, even though it is the easy thing to do; the popular thing to do.  We must resolve to do what we know is right as defined by God's Word.  It is not enough to stand quietly by.  If we do not have the courage to speak up, who else will?  We are the defenders of the truth!

William Penn once said: "Right is right, even if everyone is against it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is for it." His words ring true yet today.

Our children, and our children's children, will be affected by what we do now.  Our families must be built upon a solid foundation of godly principles.  We must teach our children, both in word and example, that the Word of God is the foundation of knowledge, and to live in harmony with that way of life.  Our families must know that absolutes do exist, that there is a difference between right and wrong, and that we will not compromise with these things. 

Mark A. Whynaucht